Monday, October 15, 2012

Coppertone Sport Pro Series (giveaway)

UPDATED 10/24/12 -- Giveaway is now closed.  The winner is #8, Heidi!  I will email you, but if you miss it, please contact me.

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Sure, I avoided running a lot during the icky summer, but now that it REALLY can't be much longer before cooler days (it IS October, after all!), it's time to get out there again.  

Just because it's cooler doesn't mean you should put the sunscreen away, though.  I've mentioned this quite a few times on this blog, but once you've seen a piece of your skin scalpel-ed off for a biopsy, you will probably not want to "go without" very often at all.

I recently got to try a new line of Coppertone sunblock spray, which claims to actually "move" with your skin so that it offers better protection.




What did I think of it??  Well, it definitely had a better smell than most spray-on sunscreens I've used, and I really didn't think it felt icky, which is kind of surprising.  It dried on really well and didn't seem to come off after running for two hours.


Dr. Elizabeth Hale, Clinical Associate Professor of Dermatology at New York University School of Medicine and consultant to Coppertone, is training for her fifth marathon – here are some of her sun safety tips for fellow runners:

·        Shield with shades. UV radiation can damage the eyes and the skin around them, so it is important for runners to wear their sunglasses. To provide the best protection for your eyes, your shades should block out 99 to 100 percent of UVA and UVB rays. Choose wrap-around frames, which stay on better while you train.

·        Replenish yourself. Drinking water can help keep your body and skin hydrated, especially if you are sweating. It is essential for runners to pay attention to how much water they are drinking before, during and after outdoor exercise. “I like to apply Coppertone Sport Pro Series with DuraFlex before stepping outside for training. This lightweight formula sprays on easily and helps keep my skin hydrated,” says Dr. Hale.

·        Protect every inch. Runners and other outdoor athletes tend to forget to apply sunscreen on all areas of their face and body. The most commonly overlooked areas when applying sunscreen are the scalp, ears and backs of hands. Just remember to bring your sunscreen and reapply every two hours.

·        Timing is everything. Schedule your outdoor training when the sun is less intense; avoid exposure between the peak hours of 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. If you do run during that time, choose a route that offers plenty of shade.

·        Go safe with your style. Make sure to protect your skin during your run with the appropriate attire. Try wearing lightweight, sun-protective clothing. Also, stay cool with a baseball hat to help shield your face from the sun.


COPPERTONE GIVEAWAY -- ends Wednesday, October 24 at 12 PM PST, US only

To enter, leave a comment for EACH item completed:

1) Leave a comment about how you protect your skin during outdoor activities. +1

2) Follow/link this blog. +1

3) Retweet the link to this post (@nobel4lit) +1

4) Follow me on Twitter @nobel4lit +1


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FTC Disclaimer: I was provided a sample of this product to try and was not compensated to provide a positive opinion of it.

16 comments:

  1. I would use it on my face . It see a lot of sun.

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  2. I always wear sunscreen when I'm outside in the sun! I'm getting old and don't want wrinkles any sooner!

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  3. We use tons of sun block. Heidiaraujo125 at gmail dot com

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  4. I always wear moisturizer with sunscreen in it. Protecting your face is important

    khbride at yahoo dot com

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  5. And already followed you on twitter (@KHBride)

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  6. I don't use nearly enough sunscreen, or at least that's what my wife tells me. I usually don't put any on unless she reminds me to. Today, my doc gave me a lecture about not using sunscreen.

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  7. I always wear hats and use sunscreen, especially on my face.

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